Eleanor Dickinson Exhibit at GTU Adams Gallery

Eleanor Dickinson Exhibit at GTU Adams Gallery

Two of her life-size line drawings will be exhibited as part of “Beyond Words – art inspired by sacred texts” at the Graduate Theological Union – Doug Adams Gallery (2465 LeConte Avenue, Berkeley, CA), 5 September – 13 December 2019. Please come to the opening reception Thursday, 5 September 5-7 pm. The works to be shown are “Adam” and “Eve,” created in 1967 for the Temple Gallery, at Congregation Emanu-El of San Francisco.

Statement about the work:
My mother, Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson, was interested in art and religion all of her life. An early exhibit was the 1967 Old Testament figures show at the Temple Gallery, Congregation Emanu-El of San Francisco. The figures were life size, free standing, line drawings on paper inspired by Bible stories. Adam lounging and Eve playing in the Garden of Eden are two of the figures from the Temple show. Another famous series she created was called “Revival!” presenting fundamentalist Christian worship in the American South. “Revival!” was exhibited in a variety of locations from 1970 to 1981, has two books about it, and can be seen in part in the collections of the Oakland Museum, Library of Congress, Smithsonian Archives of American Art, and Tennessee State Museum. Eleanor Dickinson was a powerful artist, beloved professor at California College of the Arts, feminist and art activist. She was involved in drawing the emotional expressions of people in all aspects of life, often in a religious context.

More information about Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson: https://eleanordickinsonart.com/

“Bearing Witness,” organized by the Central Massachusetts Chapter of The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA)

“Bearing Witness,” organized by the Central Massachusetts Chapter of The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA)

ADVENTUROUS ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST LEADS GROUP OF CENTRAL MASS. ARTISTS IN FALL SHOW AT GALLERY SITKA

Mia Scheffey creates a picture by intuition. She has no finished image in mind when she begins to paint. She does not simply execute a preconceived idea, following some linear logic. Instead, she builds a painting by making a mark — a brush stroke — that feels right, then in effect allows the picture to “answer” her with another message about which mark, which color, which texture needs to come next. The process can’t be rushed. It is a kind of dialogue, Ms. Scheffey says, a conversation between the painter and the painting.

The Vermont-based abstract expressionist will be the featured artist in a women-only exhibition entitled “Bearing Witness,” organized by the Central Massachusetts Chapter of The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) and mounted at Gallery Sitka in Fitchburg, Mass. Helen Obermeyer Simmons, President of the Central Mass. Chapter, explains that the exhibit will focus on the artists’ sharing of experiences (which in some cases were traumatic) as the mainspring for their artwork. “When important events have taken place in my life,” Ms. Obermeyer Simmons says, recalling the death of family members and the birth of her children, “my first response is to make an image.”

Yet the featured artist’s work is non-representational, and hence is not likely to convey anything concrete about her experiences. The work conveys emotion and impressions by way of pure form and color. Mia contends that her paintings take on a life of their own in the midst of creation. There is a tension that builds as the marks create a structure of their own. The artist has learned that mistakes can occur while creating the painting’s energy field. Instinctive and intuitive though it is, the process has its own plan and schedule, so to say, and the “stakes” get higher as the painting nears completion.

“The reason abstract painting is so difficult is that one is not trying to represent anything,” Ms. Scheffey explains. “Instead, one is reaching to articulate something as of yet unknown or unseen to oneself…a memory, a feeling, an experience. So you are always starting from a place of being lost and searching for the way, and you must discover new combinations of line, color and form to search out and express this way.”

The Women’s Caucus for Art is a non-profit organization founded in 1972, dedicated to creating “community through art, education, and social activism,” according to the group’s mission statement. WCA recognizes the contributions of women in the arts, provides women with professional development, supports art activism, and advocates for equity in the arts all over the world. At the international level, WCA is a non-governmental organization of the United Nations and a founding institutional member of The Feminist Art Project.

“Bearing Witness” is an all-women project focusing on the concerns and commitments of women everywhere, employing work in pastel, watercolor, printmaking, photography, fiber art, sculpture and collage from a feminine and feminist perspective. Artists who will participate in the exhibit include WCA members Gail Bloom, C.M. Judge, Helen Obermeyer Simmons, Tamar Russell Brown, owner of Gallery Sitka, Kate Shaffer, Joanne Stowell, Sylvia Vander Sluis, Elsa Voelcker and Susan Wadsworth. Other Gallery Sitka artists will also be represented in this show. This opening reception will take place on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2 – 4 p.m, at Gallery Sitka West, 454 Main St. in downtown Fitchburg.

The exhibition continues at the gallery through Dec. 1. Art lovers are encouraged to go to gallerysitka.com and miascheffey.com for more information.

WCA Lifetime Achievements Awards

WCA Lifetime Achievements Awards

The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) is pleased to announce the recipients for the 2019 WCA Lifetime Achievement (LTA) Awards: Olga de Amaral, Mary Beth Edelson, Gladys Barker Grauer, and Mira Schor.  The recipients for the 2019 President’s Art & Activism Award are L.J. Roberts and Aruna D’Souza.

The celebration kicks off with a ticketed cocktail reception from 5:30-7:00pm at the New York Institute for Technology (NYIT) on Saturday, February 16, 2019. Guests purchasing reception tickets will be treated to three food stations, butlered treats, an open bar, and the opportunity to congratulate the awardees. Immediately following the reception at 7:00pm, doors will open for attendees for the Awards ceremony in the NYIT Auditorium. The LTA Awards ceremony from 7:30-9:00pm is free and open to the public.

Download the Press Release

Ticket counter opens Oct 1

A.I.R. Gallery Benefit

Ticket for the A.I.R. Gallery benefit honoring Kazuko Miyamoto

$400.00

A.I.R. GALLERY CELEBRATES
FORTY-SIX YEARS OF RADICAL VISION
Tribute to Kazuko Miyamoto

Monday, November 5, 6:30pm
Zürcher Gallery
33 Bleecker StreetNew York, NY 10012

A.I.R. Gallery would like to invite you to an intimate dinner honoring the distinguished artist and early A.I.R. member Kazuko Miyamoto during her solo exhibition at Zürcher Gallery. Miyamoto has been an outstanding champion of feminist and alternative spaces in the art world at A.I.R. and at her own Lower East Side gallery onetwentyeight. She is a preeminent figure in minimalism. Her decades-long interest in line, irregularity, and string constructions can be summed up in her own words from 1973:

“Kazuko create[s] linear system[s] by extending string between nails on wall. These materials and lighting form an area of sensitivity and spaciousness. The most beautiful is to have nothing on the wall, the second most beautiful is to have line on it, and then the third is to break the wall.”

Please join us for a Japanese-inspired three-course meal prepared by A.I.R. Artists. Tickets include cocktails, dinner, and a work of art by gallery artists and friends featured in a raffle.

Very limited seating available, purchase your ticket before they sell out.