WCA CHAPTERS

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
2 days ago
Carolyn Kari Bell

Lights in the Desert 30x24 oil on cradled panel. Look at a map of the southwest US and you see vast open spaces, desert, seemingly empty land. Enlarge that map and search around to find tiny groupings of homes, a solitary ranch. It seems bone dry and completely isolated yet it is inhabited. Where do they get water, fuel, groceries? How do they survive. ... See MoreSee Less

Lights in the Desert 30x24 oil on cradled panel.  Look at a map of the southwest US and you see vast open spaces, desert, seemingly empty land.  Enlarge that map and search around to find tiny groupings of homes, a solitary ranch.  It seems bone dry and completely isolated yet it is inhabited.  Where do they get water, fuel, groceries?  How do they survive.
2 days ago
Sandra Davis

Time to showcase art's neglected women

The May 26 obituary for Mary Beth Edelson, “Feminist art movement’s leader had a theme: Empowerment,” rightly acknowledged her days in Washington and impact on feminist art. The Post pictured her 1972 “Last Supper” collage, in which Edelson replaced Leonardo da Vinci’s apostles with living female artists. She gave Washington painter Alma Thomas a seat at the table, but 69 more faces surround the scene, among them six D.C. artists: Enid Sanford, Lawra Gregory, Cynthia Bickley, Rosemary Wright, Jennie Lea Knight and Joan Danziger.Edelson showed at Henri Gallery, then a major stop on the P Street gallery strip. In the collage “22 Others,” she placed herself and her gallerist Henri Ehrsam with D.C. friends such as Post critic Paul Richard, Washington Star (and later Post) critic Benjamin Forgey, curator Walter Hopps and artists Gene Davis, Ed McGowin and Paul Reed.

Of 82 “Last Supper” women, only sculptor Danziger remains active in the D.C. area, her work shown at the Katzen Arts Center (2012) and visible now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Luce Center. Some of these artists became “names” early on, while others had to wait or missed out on recognition altogether. With dealers and historians now focused on art’s neglected women, the time seems right for an exhibition that invites them all to the table.

Jean Lawlor Cohen, Chevy Chase
The writer is an independent curator and co-author of “Washington Art Matters: Art Life in the Capital

1940-1990.”
www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/letters-to-the-editor/readers-critique-the-post-invite-neglected-...
... See MoreSee Less

Time to showcase arts neglected women

The May 26 obituary for Mary Beth Edelson, “Feminist art movement’s leader had a theme: Empowerment,” rightly acknowledged her days in Washington and impact on feminist art. The Post pictured her 1972 “Last Supper” collage, in which Edelson replaced Leonardo da Vinci’s apostles with living female artists. She gave Washington painter Alma Thomas a seat at the table, but 69 more faces surround the scene, among them six D.C. artists: Enid Sanford, Lawra Gregory, Cynthia Bickley, Rosemary Wright, Jennie Lea Knight and Joan Danziger.Edelson showed at Henri Gallery, then a major stop on the P Street gallery strip. In the collage “22 Others,” she placed herself and her gallerist Henri Ehrsam with D.C. friends such as Post critic Paul Richard, Washington Star (and later Post) critic Benjamin Forgey, curator Walter Hopps and artists Gene Davis, Ed McGowin and Paul Reed.

Of 82 “Last Supper” women, only sculptor Danziger remains active in the D.C. area, her work shown at the Katzen Arts Center (2012) and visible now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Luce Center. Some of these artists became “names” early on, while others had to wait or missed out on recognition altogether. With dealers and historians now focused on art’s neglected women, the time seems right for an exhibition that invites them all to the table.

Jean Lawlor Cohen, Chevy Chase
The writer is an independent curator and co-author of “Washington Art Matters: Art Life in the Capital

1940-1990.” 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/letters-to-the-editor/readers-critique-the-post-invite-neglected-female-artists-to-the-table/2021/06/11/a32cf8b4-cac0-11eb-afd0-9726f7ec0ba6_story.html?fbclid=IwAR2y4tV7ck9szWOTbk1qIEfTslU766oFvz6r7yK9xsjwgbZfUimAwXf89ls

WCA’s June Artist Feature of the Month is Melissa Potter a member of the Peninsula chapter!

Melissa Hilliard Potter is a feminist interdisciplinary artist, writer, and curator whose work has been exhibited in venues including White Columns, Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, to name a few. Her films featuring the lost histories and traditions of women have been screened at international film festivals, such as the Cinneffable and the Reeling International LGBT Film Festival. Potter developed research, documentary and advocacy projects with ethnographers and intangible heritage experts to protect, interpret and archive endangered women’s handicrafts and social customs. Her awards include three Fulbright Scholar grants for her work in the Balkans. Her hand papermaking project with Maggie Puckett, An Illuminated Feminist Seed Bank publication now lives in an art collection in the Global Seed Vault mountain in Svalbard, Norway. As a curator, Potter’s exhibitions include “Social Paper: Hand Papermaking in the Context of Socially Engaged Art” with Jessica Cochran and “Revolution at Point Zero: Feminist Social Practice” with Neysa Page Lieberman. A prolific writer, her critical essays have been printed in BOMB, Art Papers, Metropolis M, Hand Papermaking, and AfterImage among others. Potter is a Professor at Columbia College Chicago.

You can see Potter’s artwork on the WCA homepage at nationalwca.org and on her website at www.melpotter.com
... See MoreSee Less

WCA’s June Artist Feature of the Month is Melissa Potter a member of the Peninsula chapter!

Melissa Hilliard Potter is a feminist interdisciplinary artist, writer, and curator whose work has been exhibited in venues including White Columns, Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, to name a few. Her films featuring the lost histories and traditions of women have been screened at international film festivals, such as the Cinneffable and the Reeling International LGBT Film Festival. Potter developed research, documentary and advocacy projects with ethnographers and intangible heritage experts to protect, interpret and archive endangered women’s handicrafts and social customs. Her awards include three Fulbright Scholar grants for her work in the Balkans. Her hand papermaking project with Maggie Puckett, An Illuminated Feminist Seed Bank publication now lives in an art collection in the Global Seed Vault mountain in Svalbard, Norway. As a curator, Potter’s exhibitions include “Social Paper: Hand Papermaking in the Context of Socially Engaged Art” with Jessica Cochran and “Revolution at Point Zero: Feminist Social Practice” with Neysa Page Lieberman. A prolific writer, her critical essays have been printed in BOMB, Art Papers, Metropolis M, Hand Papermaking, and AfterImage among others. Potter is a Professor at Columbia College Chicago.

You can see Potter’s artwork on the WCA homepage at nationalwca.org and on her website at www.melpotter.com

Welcome to our new series, WCA Tech Workshops, a collection of workshops focusing on marketing and communication tech. This summer we are providing several tech workshops from social media to Google Drive to help you get comfortable with integrating tech in your art practices and use them effectively in setting and achieving goals for you and your WCA chapter. Sign up here (note: Please read class prerequisites): tinyurl.com/yk5yubba ... See MoreSee Less

Welcome to our new series, WCA Tech Workshops, a collection of workshops focusing on marketing and communication tech. This summer we are providing several tech workshops from social media to Google Drive to help you get comfortable with integrating tech in your art practices and use them effectively in setting and achieving goals for you and your WCA chapter. Sign up here (note: Please read class prerequisites): https://tinyurl.com/yk5yubba
1 week ago
Carolyn Kari Bell

Stories 20x16 oil on cradled panel. The southwest US holds so many unknown or untold stories of past peoples and cultures, of thriving communities, struggles and accomplishments. The land is harsh, dry and unforgiving yet large communities flourished. The traveler here needs to slow down, look, study and appreciate. www.karibellart.com ... See MoreSee Less

Stories 20x16 oil on cradled panel. The southwest US holds so many unknown or untold stories of past peoples and cultures, of thriving communities, struggles and accomplishments.  The land is harsh, dry and unforgiving yet large communities flourished. The traveler here needs to slow down, look, study and appreciate. www.karibellart.com
2 weeks ago
Yemonja JustHuman

Join us tomorrow at the Women's Caucus for Art “Changing the World: Women Role Models virtual art reception! 🖼Honored to jury this event! ❤️RSVP here www.wcadc.org/changingtheworld #womenrolemodels #womenscaucusforart #yemonjapaints #wcadc #changingtheworld You can also via by logging in via Facebook live! ... See MoreSee Less

Join us tomorrow at the Womens Caucus for Art “Changing the World: Women Role Models virtual art reception! 🖼Honored to jury this event! ❤️RSVP here https://www.wcadc.org/changingtheworld #womenrolemodels #womenscaucusforart #yemonjapaints #wcadc #changingtheworld You can also via by logging in via Facebook live!
Load more

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Mailing Address

Women's Caucus for Art
PO Box 1498
Canal Street Station
New York, NY 10013

Office

Women's Caucus for Art
640 Bartholomew Road–Rm 122A
Piscataway, NJ 08854 

Director of Operations

Karin Luner
k.luner@nationalwca.org
212-634-0007

WCA President

Laura Morrison
president@nationalwca.org